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Aharon's Jewish Books and Judaica
600 South Holly Street Suite 103
Denver, Colorado 80246
303-322-7345 800-830-8660

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Sponsored Results: Israeli Diamonds - Pendant

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Mile Chai
Resource for Jewish Jewelry, Israeli Jewelry, made in Israel, gifts and Judaica, Jewish Books and music and more. www.milechai.com

Aharon's Jewish Books and Judaica
600 South Holly Street Suite 103
Denver, Colorado 80246
303-322-7345
800-830-8660

14K Gold -- Israeli Diamonds
Star of David Pendant
Made in Israel K309

For Best Price Click here:

Total length approx 1 1/4"
approx 3/4" x
1"

Description for K309 Star of David with Israeli Diamonds:

This Beautiful Star pendant has 1 carat of diamonds total weight 30 diamonds total.

Diamonds are H-I in color and VS2 in clarity.

The diamonds are all from Israel. The piece itself is handmade 14k white gold

Prefect for a 30th anniversary - 30th Birthday or any occasion.
Beautiful is most comprehensive: a beautiful child; a beautiful painting; a beautiful mathematical proof. Lovely applies to what inspires emotion rather than intellectual appreciation: “They were lovely, your eyes” (George Seferis). What is pretty is beautiful in a delicate or graceful way: a pretty face; a pretty song; a pretty room.
  • Judaic
    Online store that provides a wide selection of all types of Judaica, Jewish gifts, Jewish books, Jewish ritual items and more
    www.judaic.com

Diamond is the hardest known natural material (third-hardest known material below aggregated diamond nanorods and ultrahard fullerite), and is the more costly of the two best known forms (or allotropes) of carbon, whose hardness and high dispersion of light make it useful for industrial applications and jewellery. (The other equally well known allotrope is graphite.) Diamonds are specifically renowned as a mineral with superlative physical qualities — they make excellent abrasives because they can be scratched only by other diamonds, Borazon, ultrahard fullerite, or aggregated diamond nanorods, which also means they hold a polish extremely well and retain luster. About 130 million carats (26,000 kg) are mined annually, with a total value of nearly USD $9 billion. About 100 tons are synthesized annually.

The name “diamond” derives from the ancient Greek adamas (αδάμας; “invincible”). They have been treasured as gemstones since their use as religious icons in India at least 2,500 years ago—and usage in drill bits and engraving tools also dates to early human history. Popularity of diamonds has risen since the 19th century because of increased supply, improved cutting and polishing techniques, growth in the world economy, and innovative and successful advertising campaigns. They are commonly judged by the “four Cs”: carat, clarity, color, and cut. Although synthetic diamonds are produced each year at nearly four times the rate of natural diamonds, the vast majority of synthetic diamonds produced are small imperfect diamonds suitable only for industrial-grade use.

Roughly 49% of diamonds originate from central and southern Africa, although significant sources of the mineral have been discovered in Canada, India, Russia, Brazil, and Australia. They are generally mined from volcanic pipes, which are deep in the Earth where the high pressure and temperature enables the formation of the crystals. The mining and distribution of natural diamonds are subjects of frequent controversy—such as with concerns over the sale of conflict diamonds by African paramilitary groups. There are also allegations that the De Beers Group misuses its dominance in the industry to control supply and manipulate price via monopolistic practices, although in recent years the company's market share has dropped to below 60%. The world's top diamond cutting and polishing center is India. It processes 11 out of 12 diamonds in Jewellery worldwide. The sector employs 1.3 million people and accounts for 14% of India's $80 billion of annual exports. Its share in the world polished diamond market is 92% by pieces and 55% by value.